Category Archives: Internet

Being Social For Social Justice

By MGJack

Do you Blog, Twitter, Facebook or MySpace for social justice? Would it not be great to go to just one place and add your post just once and it goes everywhere you have a social presence? I have come across an up and coming service called Hubze that will do just that for you. Please read how Hubze could really help you spread the word about your social justice cause .

What is Hubze?

Just imagine this. Would it not be great to have only ONE place you had to go online to be social? Right now many of us have to perform the overwhelming task of signing onto and posting to all our social networking sites. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, FriendFinder, Ning and all these other social networks…and the truth is…it is a lot of work. I mean should social networking not be fun and easy to do so we in fact do it. Add to that the fact that many of us use social networking as a business application promoting our business and building are brands.

How do we fix this? Enter Hubze. Hubze plans to simplify your life by giving you a platform where you only have to go to ONE place to enter any content. One place to blog, update, share, chat, email, market and search. One place to simplify your online life.

Hubze is not going to be just another social network. Hubze is not going to be just another online marketing system. Hubze is going to be the ONE STOP SHOP you need! And at Hubze simplifying your online life is only the beginning.

Hubze is all about what it’s founders call “Elegant Organization” This concept allows you to bring all of your social interactions into one place. Twitter, Facebook, Direct Matches, Linkedin, BetterNetworker, Myspace, etc. and post to all of them at the push of a button from one single platform. The Hubze MeCard is only the tip of the iceburg here and will be the first of many other services to come. Recently Hubze let out of the bag that they will provide a service that will allow anyone to customize the look and feel of there Facebook page similar to the customization folks enjoy in MySpace. The HubzeCard will always be a free service for all who sign up. For more information on Hubze and to get the HubzeCard service free go to: www.hubze.mgjack.com  for full details. You must be invited by another Hubze member like me so Click and join for FREE.

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40 Ideas for Action on National Human Trafficking Awareness Day: From Facebook to Legislation

by Amanda Kloer

Today is National Human Trafficking Awareness Day. But here in the End Human Trafficking Community at Change.org, every day is about human trafficking awareness. So to build off the awesome awareness-raising activities going on around the country, I’m bringing you ideas for action. Last year, I gave you 11 suggestions of things to do today to help end human trafficking. This year, we’re raising the bar to 40. Everything on this two-part list is a quick, easy action you can take to spread the word about and help fight modern-day slavery. But all these little actions add up fast, and if every one of the over 43,000 people in this online community did just one thing on this list, we would see a huge difference in the fight against human trafficking.

So here is my challenge to you. 1 day. 1 action. 40 ideas. What will you do to end slavery today?

40 Things I Can Do to End Slavery on National Human Trafficking Awareness Day: Part 1

1. Grab my cell: save the National Human Trafficking Hotline number (888-373-3888) in my phone, so I can call it if I spot potential trafficking.

2. Update my Facebook status with information about National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, even if it’s just an announcement that the day exists.

3. Tweet a link to an article about human trafficking.

4. Call my mom and tell her it’s National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, and ask her to call at least one friend and tell them the same.

5. Email all the people in my contact book a link to this blog, or another blog about human trafficking.

6. Wear an article of clothing which declares my support for abolition.

7. Put an abolition bumper sticker on my car or truck.

8. Distribute National Human Trafficking Hotline wallet cards.

9. Sign a petition on Change.org.

10. Create a petition on Change.org.

11. Comment on a blog post about human trafficking on Change.org.

12. Pass out flyers in my neighborhood, school, or community.

13. Put up posters in places where it’s legal.

14. Host a video or film screening.

15. Watch human trafficking videos online with my friends, family, or co-workers.

16. Invite people over for dessert and a discussion about human trafficking.

17. Find out if my state has an anti-trafficking law.

18. Ask my state legislators to pass an anti-trafficking law.

19. Attend a Human Trafficking Awareness Day event in my community.

20. Go online and buy a book about human trafficking for myself or as a gift.

A number of these actions were inspired by the even longer list available here. Click on “Take Action” for a list of ideas specific to who you are.

Photo credit: steveweaver

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40 Ideas for Action on National Human Trafficking Awareness Day: From Fair Trade to Fundraising

by Amanda Kloer

Today is National Human Trafficking Awareness Day. But here in the End Human Trafficking Community at Change.org, every day is about human trafficking awareness. So to build off the awesome awareness-raising activities going on around the country, I’m bringing you ideas for action. Last year, I gave you 11 suggestions of things to do today to help end human trafficking. This year, we’re raising the bar to 40. Everything on this two-part list is a quick, easy action you can take to spread the word about and help fight modern-day slavery. But all these little actions add up fast, and if every one of the over 43,000 people in this online community did just one thing on this list, we would see a huge difference in the fight against human trafficking.

So here is my challenge to you. 1 day. 1 action. 40 ideas. What will you do to end slavery today?

40 Ways to Take Action on National Human Trafficking Awareness Day: Part 2

21. Write a poem or a song about human trafficking.

22. Write to my congressman, asking what she or he is doing to address human trafficking in my area.

23. Write to my city council representative, asking what she or he is doing to address human trafficking in my city.

24. Make a video about human trafficking and put it on YouTube.

25. Find out if the products my employer buys are Fair Trade certified.

26. Ask my employer to consider buying Fair Trade certified alternatives of products.

27. Buy a cup of Fair Trade Coffee at a local coffee shop or a national chain.

28. Cook a meal for or bring food to a local anti-trafficking shelter.

29. Write a thank you note to my favorite anti-trafficking organization letting them know how much I appreciate their efforts.

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National Human Trafficking Awareness Day

President Obama signed a proclamation on January 4, 2010 declaring January as the “National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month.”  One of the major highlights this month is National Human Trafficking Awareness Day this Monday, January 11! Help Polaris Project use this day to spread awareness and create action in the fight against modern day slavery. On Monday we will send out news, information, and updates about the issue and Polaris Project’s work through all of our social networking sites. Please help us spread the word about human trafficking to your own networks!

How You Can Get Involved:

North Star Blog: Make sure to read our blog about the importance and significance of Human Trafficking Awareness Day! You can share this blog posting on Facebook, tweeting on Twitter, and emailing friends and family.

Twitter: On January 11 Polaris Project will tweet facts and information about human trafficking every hour! Follow Polaris Project and re-tweet messages to make a bigger impact!

Facebook: Join us in changing your Facebook profile picture (to the one above) in solidarity against human trafficking. Talk about it online and get the buzz going that slavery still exists and that with everyone’s help we can help bring it to an end! Make sure to check our status updates on Monday, January 11.

Change.org: Participate in the Human Trafficking Awareness Day Fundraising Project! Or, to personalize your efforts, start your own fundraising page!

Action Center: Check out the Action Center for all of the information regarding January 11 Human Trafficking Awareness Day. We will also have a petition available that you can sign and pledge your commitment to help us end modern day slavery. Everyone who signs the petition automatically will be entered in a drawing to win a free gift: Polaris Project t-shirt, bumper sticker, or button! Winners will be announced on National Freedom Day (February 1) via email.


Mark your calendars for this upcoming campaign!  As always we are truly grateful for your support.

Sincerely,

Johanna Olivas
Program Associate
Public Outreach and Communications

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Happy and Blessed New Year From ALENOW.org

December 3rd, 2009. Our Best Day Yet for ALENOW.org

On December 3rd, 2009 ALENOW.org got 321 hits in one 24 hour period. At least 321 people became aware and learned more about the evil crimes of Human Trafficking and Genocide. I pray they not only became aware but that they became inspired and maybe even angry and now they are members of the fight and activists for the cause. I am looking forward to a day in the near future we will blow away the number 321. (MGJ)

ICE to launch anti-human-trafficking campaign

StoryBy ALFONSO CHARDY  MiamiHerald.com

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is spearheading a campaign in Miami and 13 other U.S. cities to enlist the public’s help in identifying possible victims and suspects involved in human trafficking.

Known as a form of modern-day slavery, human trafficking involves people — usually women — being forced or lured into unpaid labor as servants, agricultural workers or prostitutes.

Victims generally come from poor countries and are smuggled into the United States and other rich nations to serve as veritable indentured servants.

Several harrowing human trafficking cases have been discovered in South Florida in recent years. Local cases involved a Peruvian woman found working long hours for little pay in Key Biscayne and a 14-year-old forced to work as a prostitute by a Fort Lauderdale man who operated an escort service.

The campaign — with the slogan “Hidden in Plain Sight” — will feature billboards and ads that include a toll-free number (866-DHS-2-ICE or 866-347-2423) that people can call to report cases to law-enforcement authorities.

Other cities launching the campaign are Atlanta, Boston, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Newark, New Orleans, New York, St. Paul, San Antonio, San Francisco and Tampa.

In Miami, the campaign involves ads on 30 Miami-Dade buses. In other cities, ads are on bus shelters or on highway billboards.

“The campaign’s goal is to raise public awareness about the existence of human trafficking in communities nationwide, and asks members of the public to take action if they encounter possible victims,” said Miami ICE spokeswoman Nicole Navas in a written statement.

About 800,000 men, women and children are trafficked around the world each year to work against their will in underpaid or unpaid labor or in the sex trade, according to federal officials.

Three ICE public service announcements for this campaign.

Not for Sale rallies against human trafficking

344tmbNot for Sale rallies against human trafficking

By Meaghan Beatley

The Daily Free Press

Human trafficking, an individual’s involuntary servitude through forced labor or sexual enslavement, is in our power to change, speakers said at a rally against human trafficking Sunday night.

Not For Sale, a worldwide campaign focused on re-abolishing slavery, co-hosted the rally as part of its “Backyard Abolitionist Tour.” About 70 attendees gathered in Morse Auditorium to hear President and author of “Not For Sale” David Batstone and various other speakers and musical performers speak about human trafficking and the steps necessary in ending it permanently.

Batstone said eradication of human trafficking relies on individuals’ sense of agency and ability to promote change.  Such changes do not need to match the scope of historical abolitionists such as Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass, champions of black emancipation prior the Civil War; it ought to reflect an individual’s personal ability and desire to remedy a social ill, he said.

 “Your goal is not to become Harriet Tubman or Frederick Douglass,” he said. “It’s to become you.”

Speakers said the pandemic of human trafficking is still dangerously widespread in the world.

Today, 27 million people live in slavery, about 200,000 of those in the United States. Eighty percent of these victims are women; 50 percent are children, with one million of these sexually enslaved, according to the slideshows presented at the event.

Following a slideshow of images featuring children once subjected to the modern-day slave trade, Koch Records recording artist Brant Christopher performed several songs of his own composition accompanied by his guitar.

Christopher said people do not realize their behaviors and routines, such as daily chocolate fixes, contribute to the issue as well.

“Seventy percent of the world’s supply of cocoa beans is located in the Ivory Coast region, particularly in Ghana, and is picked by approximately 12 to 15 thousand child slaves,” he said.

The slave trade generates $32 billion annually, according to slideshows.

Batstone said Not For Sale undertakes various efforts in order to aid adults and children subjected to human trafficking, largely involving the construction of shelters for escapees. 

Not For Sale is an organization that seeks to educate the American public on human trafficking by not only promoting awareness, but how individuals unknowingly contribute to its propagation, he said.

“Our mission is to expose the issue,” Batstone said. “We deploy data to bring about change.”

He cited various ways students may partake in the effort, which principally consisted of educating themselves and the public through sites such as slaverymap.org, a compilation of detailed accounts of slavery cases around the world, and free2work.org, a list of fair-trade companies and measures to become fair-trade.

Co-director of the Not for Sale Massachusetts chapter Sarah Durfey said as “politically charged” students, it is within their power to promote change by compelling political figures to act.

BU alumnus John Waldo said the night placed an emphasis on what students can do to address human trafficking rather than single-mindedly focusing on the dreary nature of the issue, which often results in merely “emotionally numbing” audiences instead of empowering them.

“The event presented the issue in a compelling way,” he said.

ICE gives voice to victims of human trafficking in U.S.

“Hidden in plain sight” theme shines a light on the problem of thousands estimated being held as modern-day slaves in the U.S. 

From: The Daily Citizen 

icebadgeWASHINGTON — U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has a media initiative to inform the public about the horrors and the prevalence of human trafficking, which is modern-day slavery.

As part of our continued efforts, ICE has unveiled an outdoor public service announcement campaign, “Hidden In Plain Sight,” to draw the American public’s attention to the plight of human-trafficking victims in the United States. The campaign message explains that human trafficking includes those who are sexually exploited or forced to work against their will.

Posters, billboards and transit shelter signs were rolled out last month bearing the slogan “Hidden in Plain Sight.” They are displayed in the following cities: Atlanta, Boston, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Philadelphia, Newark, New Orleans, New York, St Paul, San Antonio, San Francisco and Tampa. The campaign’s goal is to raise public awareness about the existence of human trafficking in communities nationwide, and asks members of the public to take action if they encounter possible victims.

By going directly to the American public, ICE is hoping to root out the heinous criminals associated with human trafficking. As the largest investigative agency in the Department of Homeland Security, ICE is poised to target individuals and companies suspected of using people as modern-day slaves.

“Most Americans would be shocked to learn that slavery still exists in this day and age in communities throughout the country,” said John Morton, assistant secretary of Homeland Security for ICE. “Because this heinous crime is extremely well-hidden, we need to help educate members of the public about human trafficking, and encourage them to keep alert for possible human trafficking victims.”

It is estimated that 800,000 men, women and children are trafficked around the world each year. These victims are trafficked into the commercial sex trade, and into forced-labor situations throughout the world. Many of these victims are lured from their homes with false promises of well-paying jobs; instead, they are forced or coerced into prostitution, domestic servitude, farm or factory labor, or other types of forced labor.

The greatest challenge in combating human trafficking is victim identification. Surprisingly, many people are unaware that this form of modern-day slavery occurs every day in the United States. These victims may end up in a foreign country. They are often unable to speak the language and have no one to advocate for them. Traffickers often take away the victims’ travel and identity documents. They tell their victims that if they attempt to escape, their families back home will be either physically or financially harmed.

ICE is asking for the public’s help to remain alert to recognize and identify victims of modern-day slavery who are in our midst. They are domestic servants, sweat-shop employees, sex workers and fruit pickers who were lured here by the promise of prosperity. Ultimately, they are forced to work without pay and are unable to leave their situation. ICE is committed to giving them the help they need to come forward and help us end human trafficking with vigorous enforcement and tough penalties. As a primary mission area, ICE has the overall goal of preventing human trafficking in the United States by prosecuting the traffickers, and rescuing and protecting the victims.

One example that demonstrates the horrors of human trafficking is regarding a family of four in Newark, N.J. Lassissi Afolabi, Akouavi Kpade Afolabi, Derek Hounakey and Geoffrey Kouevi were all indicted in the District of New Jersey on numerous charges, including: Visa Fraud, Forced Labor, Trafficking, Transportation of a Minor Across State Lines with Intent to Engage in Criminal Sexual Activity, Smuggling and Harboring Aliens for Commercial Advantage and Financial Gain. Their scheme involved smuggling young African women into the United States under assumed identities, and forcing them to work in hair-braiding salons in the Newark, N.J., area. The women worked six to seven days a week, eight to 12 hours per day. They were not allowed to keep the money they earned. Some of the victims were also subjected to physical and sexual abuse, and were held in servitude for more than five years. Ultimately, all the defendants were convicted or pleaded guilty to the charges and are awaiting sentencing.

In Atlanta, Ga., Amador Cortes-Meza, Francisco Cortes-Meza, Raul Cortes-Meza, Juan Cortes-Meza and Edison Wagner Rosa-Tort were indicted for adult and child sex trafficking. They physically abused young women and girls, some of whom were as young as 14 years of age; they held them against their will, and forced them into prostitution. To force them to work as prostitutes in the Atlanta area, some of the victims were beaten, threatened, or their families in Mexico were threatened.

At least one of the co-defendants was always present in the home where the women lived to monitor them and direct the prostitution work. None of the victims were allowed to leave the house unaccompanied. The victims often had to service 20 to 30 men each night. Some of the $25 prostitution charge went to the drivers who transported the young women to the “johns.” However, the majority of the money was kept by the traffickers. Earlier this year, four of the six defendants pleaded guilty to sex trafficking, which carries a minimum 10-year sentence; another pleaded guilty to a lesser charge. The last defendant is pending judicial action. All other defendants are pending sentencing.

Anyone who knows or suspects that someone is being forced to work against their will should contact the ICE tip line anonymously at 866-DHS-2-ICE. You can also view or download the video Public Service Announcement at www.ice.gov.

10 Things Seniors Can Do to End Slavery

by Amanda Kloer 

image24Human trafficking may sometimes seem like the issue dejour for students and young people, but retired people and seniors have a tremendous capacity for contributing to the abolitionist cause. Activism can help older adults stay engaged in their communities both physically and mentally and leader happier, healthier lives. Here are 10 ways for seniors to get involved in the fight to end slavery.

1. Share Your Skills: Anti-trafficking organizations can benefit from a host of skills that older people may have developed. Whether you were an accountant for 30 years or an opera singer, chances are your skill set is valuable to those organizations fighting human trafficking. Get in touch with your local anti-trafficking organization, or even a national one, and find out how your skills can be put to work

2. Inspire Your Community: Reach out to your peers and educate them about human trafficking. Invite friends or family over for a movie night about human trafficking or bring a speaker to your place of worship or community center. By getting other people you know talking, you can help inspire even greater activism.

3. Volunteer: If you’re retired an looking for a worthy project, why not volunteer at an anti-trafficking organization? I used to work at one that had a huge number of retired people on call to do emergency fund raising. They were fantastic fund raisers and had a great time doing it.

4. Mentor a Young Activist: Do you know someone, perhaps a grandchild or other young person, teetering on the brink of activism? Be the one who tips them over the edge and helps them cut their activist teeth. You have so much knowledge and experience to share.

5. Change Your Consumption Habits: I don’t care how long you’ve been buying a certain product, it’s never too late to change. Take a good, hard look at what you buy and where it comes from, and try to make better decisions about what products to support. After all, every time you make a purchase, you vote for that product. And no one wants to vote for slavery.

6. Record History: Human trafficking may be a new movement, but it’s not a new phenomenon. Have you had experiences with what we now call human trafficking before it was known as that? Record those experiences, so we can learn from the past and not repeat its mistakes.

7. Support the Next Generation of Women: Females disproportionately become victims of human trafficking because in many countries (including the U.S.) they lack the same educational and economic opportunities given to men.  There are a number of international microeconomic development programs which give opportunities to girls and women, as well as U.S. organizations like the Girl Scouts which can help low-income girls afford college.

8. Raise Funds: Money still makes the world go round, and human trafficking victims need it now more than ever. Work with your community to host a fundraiser using your skills and interests and donate the money to a local anti-trafficking organization.

9. Get Active: If you’re in good enough health, get out and get active by joining a community walk against human trafficking or other such event. If you’re not able to walk, consider working at a water station or check-in table.

10. Change the Laws: Retired people are a powerful voting bloc. Find out if the local anti-trafficking laws in your area need some help and ask local politicans to change them. Politicans may listen to you more than other groups, and actually do something.

Photo credit: aflcio2008