Tag Archives: Event

National Day of Action to End Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking Today

by Amanda Kloer

Today, thousands of advocates from across the country are coming together to take action against child sex trafficking in America. They’re calling their representatives in Congress, signing petitions, and supporting the grassroots campaign to pass national legislation that will provide critical services to American children who have been forced into the commercial sex industry. Will you join them?

In America, at least 100,000 children are forced into prostitution each year. With increased resources and an understanding that child prostitution is child trafficking, thousands of those kids are now being rescued. However, only a handful of shelter beds for those thousands currently exist. That means trafficked children have no place to go for safety, shelter, and therapeutic services. Too often, this lack of resources means law enforcement arrests these young victims  as  juvenile offenders, simply to get them to safety. This lack of resources means crime victims are being imprisoned while their traffickers and predators remain free. Continue reading

Join the National Day of Action to End Child Sex Trafficking in America

by Amanda Kloer

At least 100,000 American children are forced into prostitution each year, right here in the U.S. You can help make that number zero by uniting your voice with thousands of people from across the country to demand an end to child sex trafficking and pass landmark legislation which will keep traffickers off the streets, punish those who buy sex with kids, and protect victims.

On November 17, the National Coalition to End Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking is organizing a National Day of Action to pass the Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking Deterrence and Victims Support Act. Right now in the U.S., there are only a handful of shelter beds for the thousands of children who are being removed from prostitution each year. This legislation will mean more young domestic sex trafficking survivors will have access to the shelter and restorative care services they need. It will also increase resources for law enforcement to arrest and prosecute the traffickers and predators who victimize our children. Continue reading

GENOCIDE AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR

A discussion with Washington Post reporter Shankar Vedantam, author of The Hidden Brain

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1 p.m.
Helena Rubinstein Auditorium
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

How do we explain the actions of perpetrators, collaborators and bystanders in genocide? Fundamental questions about human behavior raised by the Holocaust continue to be debated in light of Rwanda, Bosnia and 21st century mass killings. Join us for a discussion with Washington Post reporter and author, Shankar Vedantam, whose new book, The Hidden Brain, explores how groups and unconscious bias shape human behavior and decision making.

Shankar Vedantam is a national science writer at the Washington Post. Between 2006 and 2009, Vedantam authored the weekly Department of Human Behavior column in the Washington Post. He is the winner of several journalism awards and is a 2009-2010 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University

Reservations are requested at: www.ushmm.org/events/shankarvedantam

Fair Trade Flowers for V-Day!

by Sarah Parker

It’s V-Day my friends! And like any good last-minute shopper, you know that flowers make a great a gift. Did you also know that those beautiful flowers from your local florist or grocery store may have come from Columbia, Ecuador, or Kenya?

Flowers are flown in from these countries year round, where warmer climates, cheaper labor, and lax pesticide laws allow for low wholesale prices and higher profits. As you can imagine, these conditions are ripe for slave labor conditions. According to The Toronto Star, not only are there concerns about working conditions in the industry, but commercial flowers produced in South America have been reported to be some of the most toxic, chemically-treated crops in the world. Women and children are the main cut-flower workers and can suffer not only from health and safety hazards, but also sexual harassment, abuse, and low to no wage conditions.

Different countries have instituted their own voluntary “green” certification initiatives and fair labor regulations for cut-flower workers; programs like Florverde in Colombia, Sello Verde in Ecuador, and the Kenyan Flower Council. Each has a different set of standards depending on their country’s own regulations. Some of the programs spend more time promoting themselves than they do caring for the workers they supposedly protect. And since kids are harmed by pesticide poisoning much quicker than adults, they need to spend less time on marketing and more time actually meeting the International Code of Conduct. Continue reading

2010 CURT C. AND ELSE SILBERMAN SEMINAR FOR UNIVERSITY FACULTY

Jewish Responses to the Holocaust: Teaching the Victims’ Perspective  June 2-15, 2010

The Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) announces the 2010 Silberman Seminar for college/university faculty from all disciplines who are teaching or preparing to teach Holocaust or Holocaust-related courses. The study of the Holocaust has recently shifted to include a broader analysis of the voices of the victims through diaries, letters, community documents, artistic representations, and other forms of primary and secondary sources that focus on the victims’ response to the Holocaust. This year’s Silberman Seminar will introduce participants to the variety of Jewish responses to the Holocaust—the largest victim group—and will equip instructors with the knowledgebase and pedagogical techniques required to teach this complex topic. Continue reading

ICE participates in Human Trafficking Awareness Day in South Florida

Reposted From: ethiopianreview.com

MIAMI – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the Homestead Police Department (HPD), the Miami Dade Police Department (MDPD), and the U.S. Attorney’s Office Southern District of Florida (SDFL) participated in Monday’s national Human Trafficking Awareness Day to inform members of the community about the horrors and the prevalence of human trafficking and how to report it to law enforcement.

“ICE is committed to working with our local, state and federal law enforcement partners to inform our communities that this 21st century form of slavery exists in this day and age throughout the country and law enforcement is dedicated to rescuing victims and holding traffickers accountable,” said Anthony Mangione, special agent in charge of ICE’s Office of Investigations in Miami. “Because this heinous crime is extremely well-hidden, we need to help educate members of the public about human trafficking, and encourage them to keep alert for possible human trafficking victims.”

On Jan. 11, as part of Human Trafficking Awareness Day, special agents and victim advocates of ICE’s Office of Investigations in Miami along with officers and detectives of the HPD, MDPD, and the U.S. Attorney’s Office SDFL held an informational forum presented to school staff and counselors, parents and middle and high school students that are part of a Miami Dade’s Public School Program located at the Redland Housing in Homestead, Fla. Additionally, ICE special agents and HPD officers conducted outreach to farm and day laborers by giving out brochures and informational materials on human trafficking at labor drop-off and pick-up locations in downtown Homestead. Students also had the opportunity to participate in a leadership and rock climbing wall at the school. Councilman Elvis R. Maldonado is sponsoring and supporting this event on behalf of the City of Homestead.

Human trafficking is a tragic, serious cross-border crime, and ICE is the lead U.S. federal government agency responsible for investigating and dismantling human trafficking organizations. It is estimated that 800,000 men, women and children are trafficked around the world each year. These victims are trafficked into the commercial sex trade, and into forced-labor situations throughout the world. Many of these victims are lured from their homes with false promises of well-paying jobs; instead, they are forced or coerced into prostitution, domestic servitude, farm or factory labor, or other types of forced labor.

The greatest challenge in combating human trafficking is victim identification. Surprisingly, many people are unaware that this form of modern-day slavery occurs every day in the United States. Victims may end up in a foreign country; are often unable to speak the language, and have no one to advocate for them. Traffickers often take away the victims’ travel and identity documents. They tell their victims that if they attempt to escape, their families back home will be either physically or financially harmed.

ICE is asking for the public’s help to remain alert to recognize and identify victims of modern-day slavery who are in our midst. They are domestic servants, sweat-shop employees, sex workers and fruit pickers who were lured here by the promise of prosperity. Ultimately, they are forced to work without pay and are unable to leave their situation. ICE is committed to giving them the help they need to come forward and help us end human trafficking with vigorous enforcement and tough penalties. As a primary mission area, ICE has the overall goal of preventing human trafficking in the United States by prosecuting the traffickers, and rescuing and protecting victims.

In 2008, the South Florida Human Trafficking Task Force (SFHTTF) was created. The task force is housed in the ICE Office of the Special Agent in Charge Miami and consists of agents and officers of ICE, FBI, State Department-Diplomatic Security, Miami Dade Police Department, Homestead Police Department, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Office of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Florida. The SFHTTF investigates all instances and allegations of human trafficking in the South Florida region which includes cities as far south as Key West and as far north as Fort Pierce.

Additionally, the SFHTTF works closely with non-governmental and social service organizations in its human trafficking efforts. These organizations routinely forward information regarding potential victims and trafficking networks to the task force for investigation. The task force works with organizations to provide training to other law enforcement agencies and conduct outreach to other governmental agencies, such as foreign consulates, for the purpose of identifying potential victims that they may encounter at the local consulate offices.

(Source: ICE)

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40 Ideas for Action on National Human Trafficking Awareness Day: From Facebook to Legislation

by Amanda Kloer

Today is National Human Trafficking Awareness Day. But here in the End Human Trafficking Community at Change.org, every day is about human trafficking awareness. So to build off the awesome awareness-raising activities going on around the country, I’m bringing you ideas for action. Last year, I gave you 11 suggestions of things to do today to help end human trafficking. This year, we’re raising the bar to 40. Everything on this two-part list is a quick, easy action you can take to spread the word about and help fight modern-day slavery. But all these little actions add up fast, and if every one of the over 43,000 people in this online community did just one thing on this list, we would see a huge difference in the fight against human trafficking.

So here is my challenge to you. 1 day. 1 action. 40 ideas. What will you do to end slavery today?

40 Things I Can Do to End Slavery on National Human Trafficking Awareness Day: Part 1

1. Grab my cell: save the National Human Trafficking Hotline number (888-373-3888) in my phone, so I can call it if I spot potential trafficking.

2. Update my Facebook status with information about National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, even if it’s just an announcement that the day exists.

3. Tweet a link to an article about human trafficking.

4. Call my mom and tell her it’s National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, and ask her to call at least one friend and tell them the same.

5. Email all the people in my contact book a link to this blog, or another blog about human trafficking.

6. Wear an article of clothing which declares my support for abolition.

7. Put an abolition bumper sticker on my car or truck.

8. Distribute National Human Trafficking Hotline wallet cards.

9. Sign a petition on Change.org.

10. Create a petition on Change.org.

11. Comment on a blog post about human trafficking on Change.org.

12. Pass out flyers in my neighborhood, school, or community.

13. Put up posters in places where it’s legal.

14. Host a video or film screening.

15. Watch human trafficking videos online with my friends, family, or co-workers.

16. Invite people over for dessert and a discussion about human trafficking.

17. Find out if my state has an anti-trafficking law.

18. Ask my state legislators to pass an anti-trafficking law.

19. Attend a Human Trafficking Awareness Day event in my community.

20. Go online and buy a book about human trafficking for myself or as a gift.

A number of these actions were inspired by the even longer list available here. Click on “Take Action” for a list of ideas specific to who you are.

Photo credit: steveweaver

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